survivors manchester

Team

Back

Survivors Manchester provides a variety of online, offline, 1:1 and group support direct to male survivors, along with their friends and their families.

We also provide training to police officers, counsellors/psychotherapists, and other allies health professionals; and professional support and consultancy to public authorities, health care professionals and third sector organisations.

Every single member of our small but dedicated staff team have all been affected in one way or another by the sexual abuse, rape or sexual exploitation of boys and men and are 100% committed to helping those that access our support to become empowered to break their silence, so they can move beyond those unwanted experiences and make choices for themselves based on today.

All of our team are committed to working in a non-oppressive, trauma informed, male focused manner and do not support any form of discrimination, whether on the grounds of gender, age, race, disability, religion, sexual orientation, HIV status, parental status, socio-economic class, or criminal history. All of our team understand the need for individuals to be able to generate their own identity and we are positive about male and non-binary identities.

Meet The Team

It is said that people make an organisation and here at Survivors Manchester we believe this is true. Our strong, dedicated, highly experienced and qualified staff team are so supportive of the work they carry out and of each other that it truly reflects on the delivery of our services.

Click on a member below to see what they have to say:

CEO & Trauma Focused Therapist

Duncan spent the first 10 years of his working life in the theatre, arts and entertainment. Beginning at Granada Studios Tour, to the Palace Theatre and Opera House, then People’s History Museum to travelling across the UK as Director of PR and Marketing touring the UK with some of the best shows to come out of the West End and Broadway.

In 2005, Duncan began his training to become a qualified counsellor and decided to have a complete career change after volunteering in a busy City Centre needle exchange. He spent the next few years working within a voluntary sector drug service both in harm reduction and treatment services, specialising in working with male and female sex workers, people affected by HIV and Hepatitis C, and in sexual health.

Duncan qualified from the University of Manchester as an Integrative Counsellor in 2008, having completed his clinical practice in both a voluntary and NHS setting. Always looking for ways to develop his professional practice, Duncan has completed a MA in Counselling, graduating 2010 with Distinction, and plans on developing his work further to undertake his PhD.

It was during his initial training as a therapist that Duncan began to uncover, raise his awareness and finally disclose the sexual abuse and rape he experienced in his childhood and in his later teens. Unable to find the support he needed was the catalyst to designing a service for males in Greater Manchester.

What would you like to see Survivors Manchester do in Manchester?

When I was looking for support in Manchester and realised that there was none for male survivors of historic abuse, I knew I had to do something and make sure that whatever was created had to be ethical, professional and more than fit for purpose. I now want Survivors Manchester to be able to offer a first class service to adult male survivors of sexual abuse and rape, regardless of when the event happened.

I would like to see Survivors Manchester work with other services in the community to get the message out there that men are suffering in silence and it doesn’t need to be that way!

Do you have a message for Greater Manchester residents?

Please open your eyes and begin to see that men can be victims too!

Sexual abuse affects us all, regardless of race, religion, sexual orientation, economic status, disability. We need to work together to give support to those affected, in order for them to move forward and make positive life choices.

What’s your favourite thing about Manchester?

The people! Manchester is so diverse and communities really do come together, especially in times of need. We have so many first’s here! To pick one… it would have to be the vast array of arts venues on offer, from the Palace Theatre to Royal Exchange, Odeon to Cornerhouse.

Professional Membership

Duncan is an accredited member of the BACP and adheres to the Ethical Framework for Good Practice in Counselling and Psychotherapy. He is also a member of the EMDR Association UK and Ireland.

Close

Operations Lead

Raised in Blackley in the 1980s, Chris was never really sure what he wanted to do for a career but then found himself spending 12 years in the catering industry, working in the city centre of Manchester, where he gained his management and organisation skills.

Chris states that he will always have a passion for food but felt like it was his time to move on and to start something new.

He began volunteering in the third sector with Survivors Manchester and there found a passion which he wanted to build on his experience and use his existing skills to help the service. Chris then joined the Victim Support administration team and helped with a number of big projects, including the merging of two sites into one.

Chris is happy to be back with Survivors Manchester and having made this choice, he says he looks forward to his future and hopes to be a productive member of the team (we can guarantee he is!)

Family (proud dad) and friends are the greatest part of his personal life and also has a love of football, reading, movies, music, and art.

Why did you decide to work for Survivors Manchester?

Having volunteered in the past I always wanted to come back to Survivors Manchester to take on a role full time. After seeing what the team did on a daily basis was inspiring and I knew I wanted to be a part of the organisation. The work ethic and professional attitude of the team and how they related to people using the service was always a big part of my decision to come back.

What would you like to see Survivors Manchester do in Manchester?

Give people the best service and the power back to move forward from their abusive experiences and raise awareness that we are here to help more people who have been silent for too long.

Do you have a message for Greater Manchester residents?

I’d like residents to support to reducing the stigma associated with male sexual abuse and rape, this does happen to men and they need support whether from historic or current abuse. We all need to show respect and give support to the people of Manchester and stop any children or adults from going through this.

What’s your favourite thing about Manchester?

Born and raised here all my family and friends are here, a great mix of people and for me it’s a city on the rise with a bright future.

Close

Client Services Lead

Chris is a highly experienced trauma therapist qualified in Art Psychotherapy, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, and EMDR. Before becoming a therapist Chris was a self-employed artist and also worked in various roles within the mental health and social care sector over a period of twelve years. This gave him an in depth knowledge of many mental health issues individuals may face from common mental health issues, to more complex issues such as complex trauma, schizophrenia and psychosis.

He has worked in a variety of environments and with a variety of client groups including general adult mental health, older adults, individuals with dementia, drug and alcohol misuse, individuals with learning disabilities, and individuals on the autistic spectrum.

Chris joined us in 2015 as a Trauma Informed Therapist, then became our first Senior Trauma Informed Therapist in 2016 before taking over the management of all client services in 2017.

Chris is a specialist in working with complex trauma and PTSD. He is also a visiting lecturer and clinical supervisor.

Why did you decide to work for Survivors Manchester?

I really struggled to find support when I needed it most. I was faced with services that didn’t work with men, or were shocked when a man turned up asking for help. It takes so much courage to ask for support. To be met with those reactions silenced me for even longer. Men face so many barriers to accessing support services. Survivors Manchester is a male survivor led service specifically for male survivors. It instantly takes away some of those barriers. Men feel safe, welcome, understood and believed here. It’s amazing. I don’t have the words to describe how proud I am to be part of it.

What would you like to see Survivors Manchester do in Manchester?

To continue to offer vital support to male survivors and raise awareness that sexual abuse, rape, and sexual exploitation are not gender specific. Also to expand our services and reach out to more people, in particular, areas of the community that are typically hard to reach.

Do you have a message for Greater Manchester residents?

Please be aware that men can be effected by sexual abuse, sexual exploitation and rape. It is not a weakness to need, or to ask for support. In fact, it’s one of the bravest things a person can do.

What’s your favourite thing about Manchester?

Being an art lover I enjoy the rich creative atmosphere Manchester has. I also love  Manchester’s community spirit.

Professional Membership

Chris is accredited by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and registered with the British Association of Art Therapist (BAAT) and the British Association of Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP).

Close

Communications Lead

Becky has worked in PR for over 13 years both in-house and within agencies across Manchester. Throughout her career, Becky has worked with a number of third sector clients, including Survivors Manchester, Brainwave, LEJOG Foundation, This is The Place and the Together Trust.

In 2017, Becky had the honour of being a judge for the first ever North-West Charity awards in recognition for her skills and contribution to the third sector within the region.

Becky specialises in PR and social media, working on regional and national consumer, B2B, not for profit and public-sector campaigns across a wide range of industries.

Leading PR and social media campaigns, Becky has extensive knowledge and experience delivering successful projects that demonstrate strong return on investment, raise awareness and position brands and organisations within their target publications/ sites positively.

What would you like to see Survivors Manchester do in Manchester?

The work that Survivors Manchester does is just awe-inspiring especially with the pioneering work its CEO, Duncan Craig is involved with regionally, nationally and internationally. I can’t wait to us grow from strength to strength and gain the recognition it and the whole team deserves and to see how many more lives it can positively impact.

Do you have a message for Greater Manchester residents?

Men can be victims of unwanted sexual violence too. Don’t think it couldn’t happen to you as bloke because it does – and far too frequently. If you are a mum to a son – teach them to be aware – just like you would to your daughter.

What’s your favourite thing about Manchester?

The people. After seeing Manchester come under attack in May 2017 and the public outpouring of love, support and generosity that came in the hours, days, weeks and months after it was just incredible and so humbling.

Close

Operations Assistant

Tom was set on becoming a historian after finishing a Politics and Modern History degree at the University of Manchester. However, after volunteering at a Manchester based homeless outreach project, he decided he wanted to help vulnerable individuals. Tom therefore pursued a career in the non-for-profit sector; specifically working with local organisations. Following voluntary roles such as Vice-Chairman of Manchester Central Foodbank and committee member of Mad Dogs Homeless Street Project, Thomas came on board with us here at Survivors Manchester.

Tom has an obsession with food and cooking, and has eaten his way around many towns and cities around the world. He is also a keen musician, having played the piano since he was 7.

Why did you decide to work for Survivors Manchester?

Having heard of the work of Survivors Manchester through my voluntary work in the city, I knew it was an organisation doing essential and inspiring work. Being able to be part of this work was something that excited me so much.

Furthermore I wanted to continue my work helping local organisations to develop, and therefore Survivors Manchester seemed like the perfect fit for me.

What would you like to see Survivors Manchester do in Manchester?

Continue to offer a Drop In service. The fact that ANY male survivor can come along, whether they are a client or not, is such an incredible thing.

Do you have a message for Greater Manchester residents?

Men can be victims of sexual abuse and rape too.

What’s your favourite thing about Manchester?

The community spirit! I’m aware how cheesy that sounds, but there are so many fantastic voluntary and non-for-profit organisations in the city doing inspiring work.

…also I’ll cheat and say my OTHER favourite thing is the food scene here in the city. There are some really interesting eateries and food-based projects popping up all the time.

Close

Senior Independent Sexual Violence Advisor (ISVA)

Born and raised in Manchester, Trevor spent the majority of his working life in retail management, before retraining as a social worker in 2010. Now fully qualified, Trevor has experience of working on a number of projects at several organisations, including: the homelessness prevention service for Young People’s Support Foundation (now Centrepoint) and Albert Kennedy Trust ; the ‘Changing Directions’ and ‘Skills for Jobs’ project at Salford Foundation; referral panel member for Manchester Youth Offending Team; volunteer outreach worker for Men’s Room and Safer Streets Manchester – in addition to having worked as a curriculum assistant at a range of secondary schools in Manchester.

Since qualifying in 2014, Trevor has opted to work in the voluntary sector – enjoying the freedom to use more creative ways of working with those in need of support. Having gained experience working with vulnerable young people, male sex workers, and those involved in the criminal justice system, Trevor looked for a new challenge in early 2015 following the end of his contract with YPSF. Having become aware of Survivors Manchester during his social work training, Trevor made it his mission to become a member of the Survivors Manchester Team. When the position of Independent Sexual Violence Advisor became available, Trevor jumped at the chance to apply. Trevor feels that the role is the culmination of all his experience to date, whilst also providing a new challenge. Trevor is incredibly proud to work for Survivors Manchester, even more so of the brave men that come forward to break their silence.

As a survivor of sexual abuse himself, Trevor has always wanted to help other male survivors, particularly given how isolated and scared he felt during his own experience. There was no support available at the time, and Trevor remembers how that feeling of being alone was so debilitating that he thought he would never recover. It took Trevor over a decade to regain a sense of power and control over his life, but having done so, he now feels able to support the lads accessing support through Survivors Manchester to do the same – in whatever way they feel is best for them.

Why did you decide to work for Survivors Manchester?

My reasons for wanting to work for Survivors Manchester are a mixture of my professional aspirations and personal experience of being a survivor myself. Having experienced sexual abuse as both a child and young adult, I feel that this unique perspective helps inform the work I do with the lads accessing our services. In my role as Independent Sexual Violence Advisor, not only do I have the privilege of working with an incredible team; I also get to work with some of the most awe-inspiring and courageous men I’ve ever met – far more brave that I could ever wish to be. Not only that, but I get to inform and educate members of the public and fellow professionals in order to break down the stigma and misconceptions that exist regarding male survivors of sexual abuse, rape and sexual exploitation.

What would you like to see Survivors Manchester do in Manchester?

To continue to provide support for men and boys in need…to campaign for real change, not just at a policy and legislative level, but culturally too. There are so many myths and misconceptions around sexual violence generally, and male survivors more specifically, that I feel it is our duty as a service to inform, educate and empower. At some point, I would love to expand the ISVA service to meet the needs of young males under 18 years of age, particularly given my previous experience working with children and young people. I hope that Survivors Manchester continues to build strong bonds with other organisations and agencies to raise awareness and enhance best practice across the Greater Manchester region and beyond.

Do you have a message for Greater Manchester residents?

That Survivors Manchester offers a safe and supportive space where you can explore your thoughts, feelings and experiences. A space where you can begin and/or continue your healing. That it is possible to regain control of your life, and to move towards a positive future. That being a victim of sexual violence doesn’t define you as a person…but being a survivor does. It’s an often lengthy and difficult process, but one that Survivors Manchester will support you with, every step of the way.

What’s your favourite thing about Manchester?

I’m massively into my music, so I’m really proud of the musical heritage that the city holds. I love the diverse culture that exists, and I’m proud to call myself a Mancunian because of our reputation for being inclusive and open to new influences and experiences.

Close

Independent Sexual Violence Advisor

Born and raised in North Manchester, in one way or another, Gayna’s work has always involved supporting individuals with a range of vulnerabilities and complex needs.

Experienced in various roles and settings within Social Care, including Residential & Community Mental health, Homeless Residential Support, Substance Recovery and Engagement and Community Detox.

Why did you decide to work for Survivors Manchester?

I first met Duncan about 10 years ago when I was a volunteer on the needle exchange at Lifeline. Duncan was my mentor initially and later my line manager when I successfully applied for a paid position as a community detox worker.

While working with Duncan I learned about his vision for Survivors Manchester and gained knowledge about male sexual violence, exploitation and the lasting impact on male Survivors. A number of the male clients we worked with had suffered child sexual abuse, so having Duncan as my Team Leader was valuable in helping me understand the legacy issues and trauma those clients may be dealing with.
About two years after leaving Lifeline, I was offered my first position with Survivors Manchester as Outreach & Engagement Worker on the ‘Safer Streets Manchester’ Child Sexual Exploitation project. Then in January 2017 a role was created with a need to expand the ISVA service and I was offered the opportunity to complete my ISVA training.

I already loved working for Survivors Manchester and this was another exiting, challenging opportunity for me stay with the organisation, grow, learn new skills, and continue to make a positive difference.

The men we support are a true inspiration. The strength and determination these men have is incredible. The feedback we receive from our clients is evidence that the work we do is valuable.

Not everybody gets to work for an organisation that they can honestly say they are really very proud to be a part of.

What would you like to see Survivors Manchester do in Manchester?

Make Survivors Manchester more visible and to reach the men who don’t know we’re here.

Sadly, our prisons are full of men who are there due to the direct impact and legacy issues of suffering sexual abuse as children and/or in adulthood. There’s also a population of men that have suffered sexual violence whilst in prison – and although we already do some brilliant work offering therapy to these men, I would like to see the ISVA service expand to meet their needs.

There are so many barriers for men when it comes to reporting, being in prison shouldn’t be one of them!

Do you have a message for Greater Manchester residents?

I have two messages.

After learning about the issues related to male sexual abuse and rape and the lack of resources and support, I found myself opening up discussions at home with my family and friends. I wasn’t surprised that the issue was not an easy thing to talk about for some people. So, my message is… Taboo subjects will remain taboo if we don’t discuss them. The silence can’t be broken if we do not talk.

If you’ve suffered sexual violence, telling anyone may feel impossible, so considering reporting to the police can be very frightening.

There is no right or wrong, no should or shouldn’t, when it comes to reporting to the police. The choice is yours.
Myself and Trevor can give you all the information you need to make an informed decision. No pressure or judgment – we will support you whether you decide to report or not.

What’s your favourite thing about Manchester?

It’s got to be my sense of belonging, walking down the street and feeling right at home…the community spirit, the energy and realness of Manchester and its people.

Close

Trauma Informed Therapist

Marcia came to Therapy later in life. She has a background in business and media and has worked for the BBC for many years as an Assistant Director, before deciding to re- train as a therapist. Marcia worked in the Health and Social care sector over a 7 year period, which gave her the much experience of supporting adults who have learning disabilities, ADHD, ADD and individuals who are on the autistic spectrum.

Marcia also managed staff teams whilst working in Health and Social Care, around staff training, budgeting, scheduling, staff appraisals and the day to day running of a service.

She is a qualified Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapist and Person Centred Counsellor dividing her working time between NHS mental health services and Survivors Manchester, she incorporates Mindfulness and Compassion Focused Therapy into her therapeutic work.

Marcia joined the Survivors team in 2016 as a Trauma Informed Therapist, where she works with common mental health disorders, as well as more complexed cases like psychosis, bi-polar disorder, body dysmorphic disorder and complex trauma.

Why did you decide to work for Survivors Manchester?

I’ve followed the work that Survivors do for a while and as I already worked with female survivors, I was curious about the services available for males. I think Survivors Manchester provides an essential service to those effected by the hidden societal taboo of male sexual abuse.

What would you like to see Survivors Manchester do in Manchester?

I would like to see us continuing to do the work we do, and maybe reach out to schools and to wider culturally diverse communities, where abuse is often not talked about or even recognised as a problem.

Do you have a message for Greater Manchester residents?

My message is that we need to speak out if we see or feel that someone is being abused. We can help make someone’s life a bit easier by letting them know that it’s not their fault, and we believe them; that’s half the battle.

What’s your favourite thing about Manchester?

I could write a massive list here as I love Manchester. My favourite thing has to be its northern-ness. By that I mean the uniqueness of the people, the fact that we can talk the hind legs off a donkey! Everywhere I travel people always ask if I’m from the north of England as I talk on buses, in Taxi’s and to strangers. Mancunians love to talk!

Close

Senior Trauma Informed Therapist

Ross is in his final year of a Doctorate in Counselling Psychology at The University of Manchester, having previously completed Postgraduate Degrees in Education Psychology, TV and Film production, and Undergraduate Degrees in Design Management and Interactive Design.

Although now firmly entrenched in the field of mental health, Ross has had a rather indirect career path to this point. Past work has included roles in sales and marketing, events management, and art and design. Ross’s decision to follow his heart into this career came out of the four years he spent volunteering for ChildLine and the NSPCC. He has noted that this period helped him not only find the bravery to re-train, but also helped promote him to take healthier steps himself.

While also trained as a counsellor, Ross’s experience as a psychologist has been mostly focused on the interaction between trauma and physical health across the lifespan. In the past this has meant trauma placements centralised around issues of bereavement, cancer, chronic pain and sexual assault.

Although initially meant to only stay with Survivors for a 1 year placement, in March 2018 Ross was offered a role as a trauma-informed therapist. He is trained as a pluralistic therapist with skills in Person-Centred Therapy, and CBT, and is soon to complete training in EMDR. He hopes to finish his doctorate on the ‘effects of online sexual imagery on adolescent development’ by the end of this year. 

Why did you decide to work for Survivors Manchester?

Working for Survivors Manchester has been an ambition for my career ever since I found out the service existed. It feels like an honour to be able to work as part of a charity that sets out to make such a difference, not just in individual lives, but also within communities and across national policy. A large part of my career and research has been attempting to get men to engage more with support, especially in regards to mental health. So I love that Survivors Manchester sets out to help men break the silence.

What would you like to see Survivors Manchester do in Manchester?

I’d like to see Survivors Manchester support other communities of men that might feel that silence is their only option, and help them know that they don’t have to be alone with what they have been through.

Do you have a message for Greater Manchester residents?

I’m not sure how to answer this question without writing a book. However to put it as briefly as possible; id simply say that it’s okay to talk about these things, that no one deserves to be silenced and that you don’t have to ever be alone with what you have been, and are, going through.

What’s your favourite thing about Manchester?

I love this city, I have done since I was a child. It’s where I grew up and it’s where I worked out who I am. I love the history, the style, the music, and the soul. Even after all these years I still find new things on a monthly basis, so my favourite thing has to be everything new that’s always popping up.

Close

Trauma Focused Therapist

Stuart comes from a creative background, having worked for many years as a professional musician and then later as a sound engineer and producer in recording studios and concert venues. Other than music, Stuart’s big passion is people! He was drawn to counselling after two very positive experiences as a client in therapy during some very challenging episodes in his life.

Following this he trained as a counsellor, gaining an MA qualification from Manchester University, and has been working therapeutically with all sorts of different people and issues ever since.

Stuart identifies as an integrative therapist, and strongly believes in a flexible and creative approach to working with people, where the therapeutic style and approach is fitted to each person and their unique way of experiencing the world. He has worked in two charitable organisations prior to Survivors Manchester as a counsellor with a whole range of issues including anxiety, depression, trauma, sexual abuse, OCD, self-harm and suicidal ideation, anger management, self-esteem, sexuality and identity issues.

Working as a trauma-focused therapist is a natural progression from Stuart’s other creative activities (he is still an active musician, sound engineer and producer). He believes that every encounter with a client is a golden opportunity to create a meaningful, authentic connection, and this relationship becomes the vehicle for change and a playground for exploring the many different and often paradoxical aspects of ourselves. He believes that allowing those unspeakable experiences and thoughts to be voiced and explored in a safe, supportive environment is central to successful therapy, and this where their effect and impact can be reduced or transformed into something more helpful.

Why did you decide to work for Survivors Manchester?

Survivors Manchester is an amazing charity doing very important work and supporting an under-represented group struggling with some very challenging issues. It is an area I am very passion about working in and I wanted to bring my energy and counselling skills to working with this group of people. The welcoming and supportive ethos of Survivors is a great fit with my personal values and very close to my heart. The effects and fallout from childhood sexual abuse, and adult rape and sexual assault are devastating and far-reaching.

It takes immense courage for survivors to speak out and rise above the legacy of the abuse, and being able to walk alongside some of these brave people on their journey for a while and be involved in some way in their recovery feels very important to me.

What would you like to see Survivors Manchester do in Manchester?

I would love to see the organisation continue to grow in the way that it has done over the last year, and eventually provide a service nationally all over the country. There is a real demand for the service that Survivors delivers and it is great to see that acknowledged and supported by IAPT and those that fund the service. I’m also really pleased that the it’s supporting Greater Manchester Police in the development of the Accord Programme through ‘Change Project‘, a seperate organistion aimed at those who have been abused and are at risk of offending. I believe this is a really important part of the overall picture of reducing offending and making society a safer place for everybody. I hope this area of the organisation continues to grow alongside supporting as many survivors of abuse as possible.

Finally I hope Survivors Manchester will keep speaking out about male sexual abuse and rape and help to encourage others to do the same, and break down the stigma around this subject.

Do you have a message for Greater Manchester residents?

I have lived in Manchester for almost 15 years and I can say without question there is a lot of love in this city! So my message for Greater Manchester residents is…: You are great! Keep being you, support those that need it, challenge the things you don’t want to accept loudly and passionately, and carry on being the wonderful, diverse and energetic community that makes this city a great place to live!

Mancunians are not known for keeping quiet, and it would be good to see our voices collectively being used as much as possible to raise awareness of the impact and existence of all forms of sexual abuse and violence. Never be scared to have those difficult conversations, as that is what breaks down stigma and ignorance and encourages awareness.

What’s your favourite thing about Manchester?

Undoubtedly the people! Wonderfully diverse, full of beans and sometimes more than a little bit eccentric, but the spirit of this city is second to none. I sometimes go swimming at the Manchester Aquatic Centre, and there is a huge graphic on the wall down there that says: “This is Manchester… we do things differently round here”! That sums it up for me.

I also love the music scene in Manchester, and have lost count of the number of superb gigs I have been to here. And The Sugar Junction in The Northern Quarter do the best Eggs Royale and Oreo Milkshake you can get your hands on!

Close

Trauma Informed Therapist

Simon joined us in February 2017 and is working for us as a Trauma Informed Therapist. Simon completed a 4 year Diploma in Transactional Analysis in 2017 and became a Registered Member of the BACP later that year. Prior to working for us, Simon worked for 42nd Street as a counsellor working with 14-25 year olds in Manchester. His work included supporting young people with anxiety and depressive symptoms, processing grief, eating disorders, and attachment-related issues.

Prior to working as a therapist, Simon spent time working in various roles in the social care sector supporting people with mental health, learning disabilities and acquired brain injury. He also provided training for staff working in these roles.

Simon brings elements of mindfulness, existential, and relational approaches to his work. Simon believes in ‘walking alongside’ clients in order to explore their story and understand their needs. In this way, Simon looks to find the goals and outcomes that are most important for that client at that time.

Why did you decide to work for Survivors Manchester?

I have always had a real passion for working with men, particularly in the field of mental health. I feel, from my own personal experiences, that there is a great deal of shame related to men speaking openly about their mental health which keeps them silent and perpetuates the suffering. As Survivors Manchester is all about breaking the silence of men who have been sexually abused, it felt like a perfect fit with my own values.

What would you like to see Survivors Manchester do in Manchester?

I’d like to see us grow as an organisation so we can do more of what we already do so well and reach more people. I’d like to see us engage with those communities that, for whatever reason, rarely engage with mental health services. I think it’s also important we take a role in engaging with other services and the general public to understand the impact of sexual abuse so that it becomes a conversation across the region rather than one that only happens in the therapy room.

Do you have a message for Greater Manchester residents?

It’s never too late to speak out and ask for some support, whatever that means for you. Every journey begins with a first step.

What’s your favourite thing about Manchester?

The people and the food! I do my best to have plenty of both in my life

Professional membership: Registered Member of BACP

Close

Stakeholders & Fundraisers

Helpline: 0808 800 5005

X